Queen's School of Computing

Questions About Admission to Undergraduate Computing programs

Can you tell me about Queen's Admission policies?

See this page for admission into a Computing program from an Ontario Secondary School. For other jurisdictions and programs, check out the Queen's Admissions Office web site.

Can you admit me into Queen's?

No. You must deal with the Queen's Admissions Office.

I have missed the deadline for application to Queen's. Can you help?

No. You must deal with the Queen's Admissions Office.

I want to register as a part-time student, or as a special student, or as a non-degree student. Can you help?

No. You must deal with the Queen's Admissions Office.

If I am admitted to Queen's, how can I register in a Computing program?

In the Spring at the end of first year (usually mid-May), Arts and Science students select a specific degree plan through SOLUS, and upper year students can change their plans. For students in different faculties the process is described below.

Automatic entry to Computing plans requires a B in CISC 121 or 124 and a cumulative GPA of 2.3 or better; a higher GPA can sometimes balance a slightly lower CISC 121/124 grade with the permission of the Undergraduate Chair. If you do not meet these minimums, you must find a plan in some other department for which you qualify; the requirements for each are on the Arts and Science website. You can still take Computing courses if they don't fill up, and change plans in the Spring of the following year; however you should plan for an alternative degree if you still do not qualify at the end of second year. If you do do not qualify for any plan, you need to contact the Arts and Science faculty office in Dunning Hall (first floor). Make sure to have a backup plan for what degree you will pursue if you can't get into Computing.

How do I transfer to a Computing degree program? I am currently in another degree program within the Faculty of Arts and Science.

You can change to a Computing program on SOLUS, but only during pre-registration periods in the Spring unless you need to change plans immediately in order to be in the right plan for graduation. In this special circumstance, you can change to a Computing program at any time by filling out an Academic Change Form, found on the Arts and Science website. Write in the name of your present degree program, and request a change to a Computing degree program. Obtain the signature of the Undergraduate Chair on this form, and you are all set.

If you are a first year student, you cannot change degree program using an Academic Change Form. You can either apply to the Queen's Admissions Office to change degree program, or remain in your original degree program until preregistration for second year begins in the spring. At that time, you can change degree program on SOLUS.

How do I transfer to a Computing degree program? I am currently a Queen's undergraduate in Applied Science.

It is relatively easy to transfer from Applied Science to Computing Science. Visit the Arts and Science office in Dunning Hall (first floor). Many of your Applied Science courses will transfer directly to Arts and Science courses. Students actually transfer fairly often, so the university has a good idea of the course equivalents, making the transfer a straight-forward process. Be aware that some AppSci courses do not transfer to Arts and Science, so you may not be able to complete your degree in the same time frame as if you remained in Applied Science. For a student in good standing, the transfer is more-or-less automatic.

I am currently a Queen's graduate student in a discipline other than Computing. How do I transfer to a Computing degree program?

If you have no background in computing: You can take CISC undergraduate courses while registered as a graduate student at Queen's. Contact the Queen's Admissions Office if you are interested in being admitted into a Computing undergraduate degree program. If you have significant academic background in computing science, you can apply to the M.Sc. program as a preparatory student (see the graduate-school section of the FAQ).